On the head of a pin

Creativity is definitely a must when you’re talking lapel pins. Whether you’re putting together baseball pins, a corporate piece, commemorative pins for an event, or awareness ribbons, you need to keep an open mind, while also thinking small, in order to make it work. Don’t get me wrong: never settle on your custom pins, but when I say “think small” I mean, well, literally, think about how small pins are!

I’ve been seeing a trend lately of customers coming to me with beautiful designs and logos that they’re excited about seeing on their lapels and the lapels of coworkers, friends and family in the near future. But unfortunately, many people’s eyes are bigger than their pins, and it leads to some agonizing decisions on the part of the customer as to what stays  and what gets cut. So I wanted to get the word out about this to perhaps save everyone some heartache and headache in creating pins.

Your pin is going to be as big as a penny or a quarter, most likely. And unlike a penny or a quarter, you’re stamping a design in that will be filled with enamel color. That means that putting the Gettysburg Address won’t be possible. Simple pieces of text like a year, a slogan, or an organization name are just fine. The same goes with images: you can’t fit in a customized “Where’s Waldo” collage with hundreds of people, animals and location props, but Waldo’s iconic red and white scarf would work great, if that’s what you’re going for.

In the end, there’s always a way to turn your mural into great pins. It just takes some thought and creativity on your part and the part of the art design team. And always remember, as the old saying goes: “A picture is worth a thousand words”.

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